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Tag Archives: History

Five Minutes With… Amber Butchart

Amber Butchart is a fashion historian on a quest to reveal the secrets of our sartorial past and place the semiotics of style in a wider cultural, political and social sphere. She has contributed to productions for BBC 1 & 2, BBC Learning, Radio 4, Channel 4 and Sky Arts, from the Breakfast News to Making History and Woman’s Hour, and she …

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History in the Classroom: A Teacher Speaks

Over the past few weeks politicians and academics have engaged in fierce debate about how the First World War should be remembered and how history itself is being taught in our schools. The most recent furore began on the 30th December 2013 when the BBC Radio 4 programme ‘Start the Week’ hosted by Andrew Marr discussed this very question. The …

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V&A announces new Europe 1600-1800 galleries

The V&A has unveiled details of the new Europe 1600-1800 galleries, opening to the public December this year. The £12.5m project – that will be free to the public – will see seven galleries transformed for the redisplay of more than 1,100 objects from the Museum’s unrivalled collection of 17th- and 18th-century European art and design.  Europe 1600-1800 will tell …

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Dr Joanne Paul on the plight of St Pancras Old Church

Dr Joanne Paul discusses the campaign to save St Pancras Old Church The Church’s Appeals Project is seeking to raise £350, 000 that is needed to carry out essential repairs on the Grade II* listed church, one of the oldest in London. The church is home to an altar stone dating from the 7th century, the Grade I listed Sir John Soane monument …

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The British Library hosts the Georgians

GEORGIANS REVEALED AT THE BRITISH LIBRARY Georgians Revealed – 8 November 2013 to 11 March 2014 – British Library It’s fair to say that being sandwiched in the middle of the Tudors and the Victorians has done the Georgians no favours. Like the Stuarts before them, the Georgians suffer the same level of popular neglect when held up against Henry …

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DR JOANNE PAUL REVIEWS ‘THE VAMPYRE FAMILY’ BY PROFESSOR ANDREW STOTT

The Vampyre Family: Passion, Envy and the Curse of Byron By Professor Andrew Stott Canongate The latest work by historian Professor Andrew Stott may take the reader from Soho to Moscow in tracing the affairs and tragic lives of the literary legends Lord Byron, John Polidori, Percy Bysshe Shelley and Mary Shelley, but its (broken) heart and (dark) soul remains …

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Sinead Fitzgibbon Reviews the National Portrait Gallery’s Latest Exhibition

Sinead Fitzgibbon Reviews the National Portrait Gallery’s Latest Exhibition Elizabeth I and Her People provides a rare opportunity to get up close and personal with some of most influential people of the Elizabethan period.  It features some of the most well-known portraits of the period – of Elizabeth herself, Walter Rayleigh, Bess of Hardwick, Thomas Gresham, John Donne, among many …

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FROM THE ARCHIVE: Women-Only Spaces

Lucy Allen looks at why all the best wombs are wearing misogyny gold this season. I’ve seen several discussions of the medieval birth-chamber as a woman-only space recently, including Helen Castor’s documentary. Castor claims that birth chambers were a space in which women were given extraordinary power in a habitually disempowering society – where midwives had the power to perform …

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ITV makes us Breathless

THE TELEVISION SHOW Breathless, ITV1, Thursday 9pm Last week saw the start of a new six-part medical series called Breathless. Set in a gynaecology ward in 1961, we are transported to a Britain where abortion is illegal and the contraceptive pill is only available for married women. It is the year Ernst Hemingway commits suicide, The Beatles perform at The Cavern …

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