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DR JOANNE PAUL REVIEWS ‘THE VAMPYRE FAMILY’ BY PROFESSOR ANDREW STOTT

The Vampyre Family: Passion, Envy and the Curse of Byron By Professor Andrew Stott Canongate The latest work by historian Professor Andrew Stott may take the reader from Soho to Moscow in tracing the affairs and tragic lives of the literary legends Lord Byron, John Polidori, Percy Bysshe Shelley and Mary Shelley, but its (broken) heart and (dark) soul remains …

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Sinead Fitzgibbon Reviews the National Portrait Gallery’s Latest Exhibition

Sinead Fitzgibbon Reviews the National Portrait Gallery’s Latest Exhibition Elizabeth I and Her People provides a rare opportunity to get up close and personal with some of most influential people of the Elizabethan period.  It features some of the most well-known portraits of the period – of Elizabeth herself, Walter Rayleigh, Bess of Hardwick, Thomas Gresham, John Donne, among many …

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FROM THE ARCHIVE: Women-Only Spaces

Lucy Allen looks at why all the best wombs are wearing misogyny gold this season. I’ve seen several discussions of the medieval birth-chamber as a woman-only space recently, including Helen Castor’s documentary. Castor claims that birth chambers were a space in which women were given extraordinary power in a habitually disempowering society – where midwives had the power to perform …

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Book Review: Nazis, Spies & Fakes: Ten Years at the Coalface of History

Nazis, Spies & Fakes: Ten Years at the Coalface of History By Guy Walters Lockhart Armstrong Limited It is a rather controversial time for a Daily Mail journalist to release a book entitled ‘Nazis, Spies and Fakes’, but please don’t let that stop you reading on. Guy Walters is a stellar historical journalist. The book is an assembly of Walters’ …

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ITV makes us Breathless

THE TELEVISION SHOW Breathless, ITV1, Thursday 9pm Last week saw the start of a new six-part medical series called Breathless. Set in a gynaecology ward in 1961, we are transported to a Britain where abortion is illegal and the contraceptive pill is only available for married women. It is the year Ernst Hemingway commits suicide, The Beatles perform at The Cavern …

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Take a trip to Sutton House to celebrate Black History Month

It is currently Black History Month and if you want an enjoyable day out for the family you could do a lot worse than a visit to historic Sutton House. For the next few weeks (until the 29th November) they are hosting an interactive exhibition exploring the lives of nine influential Black Londoners, including: John Blanke, the Lascars, Ignatius Sancho, …

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Child evacuees of WWII

Gillian Mawson investigates the experience of Guernsey evacuee children in England during the Second World War.  In May 2008 when I discovered that over 17,000 Guernsey evacuees had arrived in England in June 1940, just before the Nazis invaded their island, I was astounded!  I knew that the Channel Islands had been occupied during the Second World War, but had …

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Walk this way

Simon Abernethy examines a curious solution to the rise in interwar traffic accidents. … I saw a letter the other day from an indignant gentleman who said he walked where he liked. He intimated that this was a free country and he had every right to walk where he liked. If he walks off the pavement in Oxford Street he …

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