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The History Vault

Five minutes with… Dr Jonathan Foyle

Dr Jonathan Foyle is an architectural historian, author, broadcaster and Chief Executive of World Monuments Fund Britain. His latest book is about Lincoln Cathedral and will be published by Scala next March. What is an historian? The ultimate quality of a good historian is someone who cheats time itself. They can reveal truths that could have been lost to record; and encounter …

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What’s Happening in Black British History?

What’s Happening in Black British History? A Conversation Senate House Malet Street London WC1E 7HU Thursday 30th October – tickets £7.50-£15 Thirty years after the publication of Peter Fryer’s Staying Power, immigration is still a hotly contested topic, while slavery continues to dominate popular perceptions of Black British History. New research is revealing different stories, but how is this being …

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“Messy” vs. Real Tears by Sigrid MacRae

“The world has always been messy,” President Obama told America recently. Total media immersion has probably magnified our awareness of it all, but buck up! We’ll get through it; we have before. He’s right about the mess. The Middle East is awash in frenzied blood-letting. Ebola, power grabs, planes flung out of the sky, land grabs, bombings, countless refugees, ISIS, …

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Bloody Scotland by Malcolm Archibald

An exclusive extract from Malcolm Archibald’s new book Bloody Scotland: Crime in 19th Century Scotland Chapter One Resurrection Men Some crimes are universal, but others are specific to place or time. Body-snatching was one such. It flourished in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries and died out completely with the passing of the Anatomy Act of 1832. Until that time, body-snatching …

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Five minutes with… Dan Jones

Dan Jones is a medieval historian, author and award winning journalist. His latest book The Hollow Crown: The Wars of the Roses and the Rise of the Tudors is published by Faber and Faber and is out 4th September 2014.  What is an historian? Researcher, thinker, writer, storyteller, author, TV presenter, radio voice, lecturer, journalist, talking head. Tweeter. Truth-teller. Social …

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Anne Boleyn’s Enduring Appeal

Born in 1501, Anne Boleyn was only eight years old when Henry VIII married his first wife Catherine. By 1522 she would become one of Catherine’s ladies in waiting and eleven years later she would become Henry VIII’s wife.  It lasted less than three years, but it was one of the most significant marriages in English history. We speak to authors …

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BOYS IN THE BOAT – A epic tale from the 1936 Olympics

In 1936 the US rowing team were victorious at Hitler’s 1936 Olympics. In THE BOYS IN THE BOAT Daniel James Brown charts their epic quest for gold in a dramatic new book that has already been optioned by the The Weinstein Company.  A conversation with the author… How did you discover the story that became THE BOYS IN THE BOAT? One day …

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The Great Fire – First Look

ITV has released a tantalizing taster of their epic new series about The Great Fire of London, starring Andrew Buchan, Charles Dance, Rose Leslie, Jack Huston and Daniel Mayes. Penned by Tom Bradby, the landmark drama is set to be broadcast this autumn.    

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ICONIC TEXTS: Dr Jenny McAuley on ‘Vindication of the Rights of Woman’ by Mary Wollstonecraft

‘It requires a legion of Wollstoncrafts to undermine the poisons of prejudice and malevolence.’  Mary Robinson, 1799. In the fourth installment of our new series of podcasts, Dr Jenny McAuley explores a text written by a trailblazing advocate of women’s rights.  Mary Wollstonecraft’s Vindication of the Rights of Woman – conceived during the late eighteenth century – made a profound case for the …

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Bismarck in Biarritz – a matter of life and death

Tony Boullemier explores what could have been… THE sliding doors of history hold a grim fascination. How our lives could have changed had things turned out just a little bit differently. Last month I stumbled on a grim case in point where one man’s lucky break arguably led to two world wars and tens of millions of deaths. Ever since I published …

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