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The History Vault

Historians for Britain: The Betrayal of History and Historical Practice

By Fiona Whelan and Kieran Hazzard Historians for Britain consists of a group of scholars attempting to use history to push a political agenda by utilising history facts to aid in the debate about the relationship between Britain and the EU, but also to justify a renegotiation of Britain’s position within the EU. Representing the group, David Abulafia of the …

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EVENT! Pregnancy, False Pregnancy, and Questionable Heirs: Mary I and her Echoes

Pregnancy, False Pregnancy, and Questionable Heirs: Mary I and her Echoes 16 April 2015 Wednesday May 20 5-7pm Lecture Roberts G08, Sir David Davies Lecture Theatre, Roberts Building This illustrated lecture examines beliefs – medical and cultural – about phantom pregnancies in early modern England with specific connections to the political implications of Mary I’s false pregnancies. While historians have …

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Richard III – from zero to hero? By Tony Boullemier

THEY say the sun shines on the righteous. If so, the controversial reputation of King Richard lll was vindicated on Sunday, March 22. It was a glorious day for a funeral as the remains of our last Plantagenet king were taken back to Bosworth Field, the scene of his final fateful battle. There were so many of us at the …

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Murder, Mayhem and Music Hall: The Dark Side of Victorian London by Barry Anthony

During the first half of the nineteenth century the Strand’s reputation as a place of recreation was reinforced by new and expanded forms of entertainment. Where amateurs had previously ‘obliged’ at ‘Free and Easy’ concerts, professional performers started to appear in the singing rooms of taverns. Venues such as the Coal Hole, Strand, and the Cyder Cellars,  Maiden Lane, offered …

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Witchcraft in Early Modern Poland 1500-1800 by Wanda Wyporska

Here follows an extract from Wanda Wyporska’s new book Witchcraft in Early Modern Poland 1500-1800: In 1613 the good gentlemen of Kalisz’s municipal court arrived in the village of Kucharki to try Dorota of Siedlików and Gierusza Klimerzyna. Listening to a wide range of testimonies, they heard tell of sex with the Devil, ruined beer, stolen milk, a visit to …

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Five minutes with… Hallie Rubenhold

Hallie Rubenhold is an author, social historian and broadcaster. Her second book, Lady Worsley’s Whim, about a notorious 18th century Criminal Conversation (or adultery) trial has been adapted for screen by the BBC. Starring Natalie Dormer (Hunger Games, Game of Thrones), it will be broadcast in August. What is an historian? An historian is someone who is dedicated to an …

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Five minutes with… Terry Deary

Terry Deary is well known as the author of the Horrible Histories series. His new book series, Dangerous Days is popular history aimed at adult readers.   The latest in the series, Dangerous Days in Elizabethan England, is out now, published by Weidenfeld & Nicolson. What is an historian? I think you’d have to ask an historian that. I’m just a …

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The Dead Duke, His Secret Wife and the Missing Corpse by Piu Marie Eatwell

Exclusive extract from the first chapter of  ‘The Dead Duke, His Secret Wife and the Missing Corpse’ by Piu Marie Eatwell After a long and dreary drive through wet country lanes, the party that included the ‘young duke ’ – for that was the identity of the pale and heavy-eyed young man of twenty-two – arrived at its destination. Welbeck …

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Five minutes with… Dr Ian Mortimer

Dr Ian Mortimer is an acclaimed historian, bestselling author and television presenter. His latest book Centuries of Change: Which Century saw the Most Change and Why it Matters to Us is published by Random House and out now. What is an historian? A historian (I don’t use the old-fashioned ‘an’, I pronounce the ‘h’ instead) is simply someone who studies …

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The Queen’s Influence… by Sara Cockerill

The role of Eleanor of Castile as queen consort – and her influence over Edward I There is a fiction common in Victorian writing, that Edward I referred to Eleanor of Castile as “chère reine” and that it was thus that the Charing Cross derived its name.  In fact both elements of this fiction are wrong.  As is now moderately …

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